Top 10 blogs for writing teachers

1. The Writing Teacher

This blog offers “tips, techniques and strategies for teaching writing.” Some recent posts include Complete the Learning Cycle with Peer Editing, Teaching Writing for the Sciences, and Notice It, Practice It, Try It: Using Shared Writing and Collaborative Writing to Promote Independent Application. The site also offers writing contests and webinars.

2. Two Writing Teachers

Two teachers, one living in New York and one living in Indiana, collaborate on this blog, which aims to be a source for teachers to read about the latest research and ways to apply it in their teaching, to get ideas, and to find inspiration. The blog authors also share their own writing, as well as their reflections on their teaching successes and failures. There are also tools and resources that teachers can use in their classrooms.

3. Living Life Twice

“People who write get to live life twice – in the moment and in retrospect. That’s what sets writers apart,” says the introduction to this blog. There are reflections on writing and teaching writing, as well as links for writing teachers. Some recent posts include Charting Our Progress – Using Anchor Charts, A Place For Teachers To Begin Writing, and Lack of Attention – Too Much Screen Time!

4. Teaching Authors

Who better to talk about writing than those who have been professional writers? Six authors of children’s books who also write run this blog, which offers resources and personal reflections on writing. The site offers writing workouts, teaching tips, author interviews, reviews and more. There is also a section called “Ask the Teaching Authors” for personalized answers.

5. Online Writing Teacher

A writing teacher discusses his work towards developing online writing courses for Drexel University, and along the way, he shares information about teaching writing in online and hybrid settings. His focus is on first-year writing. Recent posts discuss message board prompts, time commitments for online teaching, and facilitating online conversations.

6. Diary of a Writing Teacher

Sara teaches composition, rhetoric, and literature courses at the university level, and she writes this blog to reflect on personal and academic experiences related to teaching and the written word.

7. Lore: An E-Journal for Teachers of Writing

This academic journal explores the pedagogy of teaching writing, and is published by teaching assistants, adjunct and assistant professors. Articles also explore the ups and downs of the profession.

8. Idea Warehouse

Wendy Austin writes this blog, which offers reflections on writing, as well as technology, plagiarism, first-year composition courses, college teaching, technical writing, business writing, and business culture.

9. Yellow Dog

J.Rice is an associate professor of English and the director of the Campus Writing Program at the University of Missouri. His blog covers “pedagogy, networks, new media, space, and rhetoric.”

10. Vitia

Mike Edwards is an assistant professor of English at a four-year college. He writes about “rhetoric, class, technology, economics, and the teaching of writing.” Some recent posts include Freedom and Property, ,a href=”http://www.vitia.org/wordpress/2010/01/29/digital-maoism-for-digital-rhetoricians/”>”Digital Maoism” for Digital Rhetoricians, and The Teleology of Capitalism.

Posted on 07/21/10 | by maria magher | in Education | 2 Comments »

2 Comments on “Top 10 blogs for writing teachers”

  1. Carmela Martino Says:

    Hi Maria,
    Thanks for mentioning our TeachingAuthors blog. We’re so honored to be included on this list. I do have one correction to the description of our blog. In the following sentence:
    >>Six authors of children’s books who also write run this blog, which offers resources and personal reflections on writing. <<
    it should say we are "Six authors of children’s books who also TEACH . . ." We are all writing teachers as well as published authors.
    Thanks again,
    Carmela Martino
    TeachingAuthors

  2. maria Says:

    Thanks, Carmela! That was, of course, was I meant to write — thanks for bringing it to my attention. And thanks for what you do on your blog!
    Maria

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